Tipping Etiquette Header

The tipping etiquette varies from country to country, and it can easily become a nightmare to get it right. The goal of this page is not having you go through a whole lengthy article discussing about all aspects of tipping in a particular country. It aims to provide quick, fluff-free and complete answers to the following questions:

  • Do I need to tip in [insert country here]?
  • Who to tip and how much to give?

As simple as that. Whether you are preparing your next Caribbean vacation, a trek in Nepal or a safari in Zambia, we’ve got you covered. No more awkward situations.

We have based the list on the ISO 3166-1 standard, which lists 249 countries and territories. After removing territories that have no human population or that made little sense keeping, we are left with 238 countries and territories. Of course, many countries in the world are not recommended to visit right now because of unfortunate reasons such as war or terrorist risk.

We have still chosen to include these countries as well, because we believe that one day, the situation will get better and we will be able to visit them. The goal is to build the most complete database possible about tipping across the world. This worldwide tipping information also provides interesting insights about local cultures.

How to Use This Page

The Color Code

 

Tipping is either mandatory, or at least usual / customary and most of the time expected – in other words, you should tip.

 

Tipping is not expected/mandatory, but appreciated – tip if good service and/or if you are feeling generous.

 

Tipping is not expected, unusual or not recommended – no need to tip in these countries.

Accessing The Information

  • Mouse over any country on the map to get a summary of the tipping culture in this country (on desktop/laptop).
  • Click on any country on the map to get more detailed information about the tipping etiquette in this country, including who and how much to tip.
  • If the country you are looking for is too small to be displayed on the map or if maps are not your thing, you can find the same information as plain text at the end of the article. All 328 countries / territories are listed.
  • The interactive map is best seen on a desktop computer or laptop.

Tipping Etiquette: The Map

Tipping Culture Placeholder
Tipping Culture

A Few Takeaways

  • If you have no idea of how much to tip, 10% is the safest bet across the world.
  • Tipping is expected and customary in the whole of North America, most of the Caribbean, large parts of Africa & the Middle-East, parts of Central/Southern Europe and the Indian Subcontinent.
  • In places where there is a tip box, it’s a good idea to use it as your tips will be shared among all the staff.
  • The best way to tip hotel housekeepers is to leave a tip each day on the pillow or on the bedside table, as staff often rotates and may not be the same from a day to another.
  • For tour guides and drivers, we show a recommended amount to tip “per day”. For half day tours, tip half this amount. Tipping is often done at the end of the tour.
  • Tipping is not recommended in most island nations of the South Pacific Ocean, because it goes against the Polynesian culture.
  • Tipping is not recommended and can be insulting in Japan.
  • In some countries, U.S. Dollars are not the main currency, but they are accepted along with the local currency. If you wish to use U.S. Dollars in such countries, make sure you are using recent, crisp bank notes only.
  • It is recommended to be generous, maybe more generous than usual in these pandemic times. Service providers are on the front line, exposing themselves to the risk of contracting Covid-19 even more than other parts of the population. It is only fair that we show them our gratitude and recognition by tipping them more generously.

Stats: Number of Countries/Territories

These stats show the proportion of countries / territories for each tipping culture type – expected, not expected but appreciated, or not expected – for the world and for each continent. Some percentages were very slightly rounded to make them easier to read.

  • We learn that tipping is not expected but appreciated in nearly half of the world’s countries and territories, and it is customary in about one third of the world. 21% of the world’s countries & territories do not practice tipping.
  • We also learn that tipping is the most customary in the Americas and Africa, and the least customary in Asia-Pacific. In more than half of Europe, tipping is not expected but appreciated.

Global (238 Countries / Territories)

Tipping not expected but appreciated (112): 47% of all Countries / Territories
Tipping expected / common practice (76): 32% of all Countries / Territories
Tipping not expected / not recommended (50): 21% of all Countries / Territories

Africa

  • 33 Countries / Territories (58%)
  • 22 Countries / Territories (38.5%)
  • 2 Countries / Territories (3.5%)

Americas

  • 22 Countries / Territories (40%)
  • 27 Countries / Territories (49%)
  • 6 Countries / Territories (11%)

Europe

  • 28 Countries / Territories (55%)
  • 12 Countries / Territories (23.5%)
  • 11 Countries / Territories (21.5%)

Asia-Pacific

  • 29 Countries / Territories (39%)
  • 15 Countries / Territories (20%)
  • 31 Countries / Territories (41%)

Stats: World Population

These stats show the proportion of the world’s population for each tipping culture type – expected, not expected but appreciated, or not expected – for the world and for each continent (population data from Worldometer). Again, the percentages were very slightly rounded to make them easier to read.

  • Tipping is customary and expected for 38.5% of people in the world, and not mandatory but appreciated for 35.5% of people. It means that tipping is a positive action for roughly three quarters (74%) of the world’s population.
  • About one quarter (26%) of the world’s population does not practice tipping.
  • Tipping is part of the culture for more than half of the African and American populations. Only half a percent of the African population and a quarter of a percent of the American population do not practice tipping.
  • Almost equal proportions of the Asia-Pacific population consider tipping as customary and not necessary (37 and 36% respectively).
  • Tipping is not expected but appreciated for more than 65% of the European population.

Global (7.8 billion people)

Tipping expected / common practice: 38.5% of the global population
Tipping not expected but appreciated: 35.5% of the global population
Tipping not expected / not recommended: 26% of the global population

Africa

  • 51.5% of the population
  • 48% of the population
  • 0.5% of the population

Americas

  • 57.5% of the population
  • 42.25% of the population
  • 0.25% of the population

Europe

  • 65.5% of the population
  • 27% of the population
  • 7.5% of the population

Asia-Pacific

  • 37% of the population
  • 36% of the population
  • 27% of the population

Tipping Etiquette: The Country List

Quick Access

Click on the continents to expend or collapse the list of countries.

Africa

Tipping in Algeria

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Algeria but much appreciated.

Tipping is not compulsory in Algeria but always appreciated, it is a way to support workers who often have very low wages.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel porter: 100 Algerian dinars ($0.80) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 100 Algerian dinars ($0.80) per bag
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 10-15% of the tour price

Tipping in Angola

 

Tipping in Angola is usually not expected (but appreciated), with one exception.

Tipping is not really customary in Angola, but you can still leave a small tip to show appreciation for good service. The only tip that is expected is for tour guides and drivers.
Restaurant: up to 10% of the bill if great service
Bartender: no tip expected or round up the bill
Hotel: a service charge will probably be already included, tip small change if great service
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Tour driver: 5% of the tour price

Tipping in Benin

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Benin but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Benin but always appreciated and more common with tourism-related services.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Bartender: tipping not common
Hotel porter: 200 CFA Francs ($0.36) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 200 CFA Francs ($0.36) per day
Tour/safari guide: 10% of the tour price
Tour/safari driver: 5% of the tour price

Tipping in Botswana

 

Tipping is usually expected in Botswana.

Tipping is customary in Botswana and expected for tourism-related services.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill (especially if no service charge was included)
Bartender: 10% of the bill (especially if no service charge was included)
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-3 per night
Group tour/safari guide: $10 per person per day
Private tour/safari guide: $20 per person per day
Safari trackers: $5 per person per day
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Burkina Faso

 

Tipping is not mandatory but customary and expected in Burkina Faso.

Tipping is customary and most of the time expected in Burkina Faso, particularly for tourist services.
Restaurant: a 10-15% service charge is often included. Tip this same amount if no service charge, tip extra if great service.
Bartender: service charge is usually included, round up the bill if good service
Hotel bellboy: 300 CFA Francs ($0.50) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 300-500 CFA Francs ($0.50-$0.90) per day
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour price
Taxi: 10-15% of the fare

Tipping in Burundi

 

Tipping is not expected but appreciated in Burundi.

Tipping is not compulsory in Burundi, but appreciated, and should be used as a way to show appreciation for great service.
Restaurant: up tp 10% of the bill. The higher end the restaurant, the most expected the tip is.
Bartender: no tip expected unless table service
Hotel staff: small change in local currency
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide/driver: 5-10% of the tour price

Tipping in Cabo Verde

 

Tipping is common practice in Cabo Verde.

Tipping is customary in Cabo Verde for any good service.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Bartender: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 100 Escudos ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 100 Escudos ($1) per day
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Tour driver: 5% of the tour price

Tipping in Cameroon

 

Tipping in Cameroon is not compulsory but customary.

Tipping is not a requirement in Cameroon but it is very common, usual practice, and even more so with tourists.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1000 CFA Francs ($1.80)
Hotel housekeeper: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80) per day
Tour guide/driver: $15 per day
Taxi: 5-10% of the fare if great service

Tipping in Central African Republic

 

Tipping is not expected in the Central African Republic, but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory or expected in the Central African Republic, but always appreciated. Most of the time, you tip by leaving small change in local currency, the CFA Franc (500 CFA Francs = 0.90 USD).
Restaurant: leave small change or round up the bill. Up to 10% of the bill in upscale restaurants.
Hotel staff: leave small change (500-1000 CFA Francs)
Tour guide/driver: 10% of the tour price

Tipping in Chad

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Chad but customary and often expected.

Tipping is generally not compulsory in Chad, but always appreciated and often expected, particularly from foreigners. Tip in local currency, the CFA Franc (500 CFA Francs = 0.90 USD).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Bartender: round up the bill
Hotel staff: leave small change (500-1000 CFA Francs)
Tour guide/driver: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Comoros

 

Tipping in Comoros in not compulsory but often expected.

Tipping is not a requirement in Comoros but it is common practice and often expected.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 200 Comorian Francs ($0.50) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 200-400 Comorian Francs ($0.50-$1) per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Congo

 

Tipping is generally expected from tourists in Congo.

Tipping is customary in Congo and most of the time expected for tourism-related services.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80) per day or use tip box
Taxi: tip not expected or round up the fare
Tour guide: 5500 CFA Francs ($10) per day per person
Tour driver: 5500 CFA Francs ($10) total from the group

Tipping in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

 

Tipping is not compulsory in the Democratic Republic of the Congo but much appreciated.

Tipping is voluntary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo but pretty common from foreign tourists and always appreciated. Tipping can be done in Congolese Francs or in recent US Dollar notes that are in good condition.
Restaurant: 5-7% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1000 Congolese Francs ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1000 Congolese Francs ($1) per day
However, if there is a tip box, it is better to use it to drop your tip, so it can be shared by the hotel staff.
Taxi: tip not expected or round up the fare
Tour guide/driver: 5-10% of the tour price
Trek porter: no tip expected on top of their salary
National park ranger: $2-$5

Tipping in Côte d’Ivoire

 

Tipping in Côte d’Ivoire is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not compulsory in Côte d’Ivoire but appreciated, to reward good service
Restaurant: a 10% service charge is usually included. Add 5% for great service.
Hotel bellboy: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80) per night
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost
Taxi: no tip expected, up to 10% of the fare if help with luggage

Tipping in Djibouti

 

Tipping is customary and usually expected in Djibouti.

Tipping is part of the culture in Djibouti and is most of the time expected.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 200 Djiboutian Francs ($1.10) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 200-300 Djiboutian Francs ($1.10-$1.70) per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Tour driver: 5% of the tour price
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare if help with luggage

Tipping in Egypt

 

Tipping is customary and expected in Egypt.

Tipping is part of the culture and expected for any service in Egypt. The local word for tip is backsheesh.
It is better to tip in the local currency, the Egyptian Pound (LE).
Restaurant: the service charge doesn’t go to the waiter. Tip the waiter 10% of the bill
Bar: 10% of the bill
Hotel staff: any service should be tipped (doorman, bellboy, housekeeper, calling a taxi for you…) The typical tip is 10 LE ($0.64) – 10 LE per night for the housekeeper.
Tour driver: 50 LE ($3) per day
Tour guide: 100 LE ($6) per day
Bathroom attendants: 2 LE ($0.13)
Taxi: for negotiated fare, no tip expected | For metered taxi, 10% of the fare

Tipping in Equatorial Guinea

 

Tipping is voluntary in Equatorial Guinea but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Equatorial Guinea but it is appreciated, and quite customary at the restaurant as service charge is often not included.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel staff: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80)
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Eritrea

 

Tipping in Eritrea is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not required or expected in Eritrea, but it is always appreciated. It is more common to tip in larger cities.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel staff, taxi: small change in local currency, such as 10 Nakfas ($0.66)

Tipping in Ethiopia

 

Tipping is not expected in Ethiopia but appreciated.

Tipping is voluntary in Ethiopia but always appreciated. It is a common way to show appreciation for good service.
Nice western restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Small local restaurant: 5-10 birr ($0.15-$0.30)
Hotel bellboy: 10 birr ($0.30) per bag)
Hotel housekeeper: 10 birr ($0.30) per day
Tour/safari guide: 200 birr ($5.40) per person per day
Trek porter: 60 birr ($1.60) per day
Taxi/bajaj (tuk-tuk): no tip expected. Negotiate the fare.

Tipping in Gabon

 

Tipping in Gabon is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Gabon but appreciated. Service charge is not included in the bill in Gabon.
Nice tourist restaurant: 10% of the bill (tip is usually expected)
Small local restaurant: no tip expected
Hotel bellboy: 500 CFA Francs ($0.90)
Tour guide and driver: 5-10% of the tour price each
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Gambia

 

Tipping is usually expected in Gambia.

Tipping is most of the time expected and always appreciated in Gambia, as wages are low. Tips often are a significant portion of their salaries. Always use the tip box if you see one.
Restaurant: 7.5% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 25 dalasis ($0.50)
Hotel housekeeper: 25 dalasis ($0.50) per day
Tour guide: 100-200 Dalasis ($2-$4) per person per day
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare if help with luggage

Tipping in Ghana

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Ghana but it is customary.

Tipping is not a requirement in Ghana but it is usual and often expected – and always appreciated.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill (in touristy areas)
Small local restaurant: 1 cedi ($0.20)
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 cedis ($0.20-$0.40) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 2 cedis ($0.40) per day
Airport porter: 1-2 cedis ($0.20-$0.40)
Any small help/service you receive: 1-2 cedis ($0.20-$0.40)

Tipping in Guinea

 

Tipping in Guinea is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Guinea but always appreciated, as wages are low.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Bar: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel staff: small change
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Guinea-Bissau

 

Tipping in Guinea-Bissau is not customary but appreciated.

Tipping is not very common in Guinea-bissau but always appreciated, as wages are low.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Bar: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel staff: small change
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Kenya

 

Tipping is common practice in Kenya.

Tipping is usual in Kenya and most of the time expected from tourists. Wages are low and service providers rely heavily on tips. You should tip in local currency, the Kenyan Shilling.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Bartender: 30-50 Shillings ($0.30-$0.50) per round
Hotel bellboy: 50-200 Shilling ($0.50-$2)
Hotel housekeeper: 200-500 Shillings ($2-$4.60) per week
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 100-200 Shillings ($1-$2) per person per day

Tipping in Lesotho

 

Tipping is common and expected in Lesotho.

Tipping in Lesotho mostly follows the same rules as in South Africa, and it is customary and expected. Tipping is important as wages are low. You should tip in local currency, the Lesotho Loti.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Bar: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 5-10 lotis ($0.30-$0.60) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5-10 lotis ($0.30-$0.60) per night
Tour guide/ranger: 10-15% of the tour cost
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Liberia

 

Tipping in Liberia is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Liberia but it is much appreciated because wages are low. Both the Liberian Dollar (LD$) and the U.S. Dollar are used.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 200-300 L$ ($1.10-$1.70) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 400 L$ ($2.20) per day
Tour guide/driver: 5% of the tour cost
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Libya

 

Tipping is generally not expected in Libya.

Tipping is most of the time not expected in Libya. A service charge is included in the price for services and there is no expectation to tip further.
You can try giving small change to your tour guide or rounding up the taxi fare, if you want to.

Tipping in Madagascar

 

Tipping is expected from tourists in Madagascar.

Tipping is not very much practiced among locals in Madagascar, but it is common and usually expected from tourists.
Tipping should be done in local currency, the Malagasy Ariary (MGA). 1 USD = 4000 MGA
Restaurant: 10-15% if no service charge
Hotel porter: 2000 MGA ($0.50) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 4000-6000 MGA ($1-$1.50) per night
Tour guide: 30,000-40,000 MGA ($7-$10) per day
Tour driver: 20,000 MGA ($5) per day

Tipping in Malawi

 

Tipping in Malawi is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Malawi and usually not expected, but it is much appreciated because wages are low.
Tipping should be done in local currency, the Malawian Kwacha (MWK).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel porter: 800 MWK ($1) per bag
Hotel/lodge staff, housekeeper: 2300 MWK ($3) per person per day
Safari/tour guide: 3800 MKW ($5) per person per day

Tipping in Mali

 

Tipping in Mali is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not required or even customary in Mali but it is much appreciated because wages are low.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill, or just round up the bill in a smaller restaurant
Bar: round up the bill
Hotel porter: 500 CFA Francs ($0.90) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80) per night
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 4000-5000 CFA Francs ($8) per day
Tour driver: 2000-2500 CFA Francs ($4) per day

Tipping in Mauritania

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Mauritania but expected from tourists.

Tipping is not extremely common in Mauritania among the local population, but it is always appreciated and most of the time expected in the tourism industry. Tour guides usually do expect tips from tourists. You sould tip in local currency, the Mauritanian Ouguiya (MRU).
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill if no service charge (upscale restaurant) | no tip expected or round up the bill in small, local restaurant
Hotel porter: 100 MRU ($2.70)
Hotel housekeeper: 100 MRU ($2.70) per day
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Mauritius

 

Tipping in Mauritius is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Mauritius but it is always appreciated. Tipping is directly related to how much you appreciated the service. If someone made an extra effort to give a better service, it would be fair to tip.
The local currency is the Mauritian Rupee. 1 USD = 40 Rs.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge. You can give a little extra (such as 100 Rs) to the waiter.
Bar: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: 100 Rs ($2.50)
Hotel staff: 200-500 Rs ($5-$12) to be given at the end of your stay to any staff who has been helpful to you
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost (quite expected)
Tour driver: 5% of the tour cost
Taxi: 100 Rs ($2.50) extra

Tipping in Mayotte

 

Tipping is not common practice in Mayotte.

Mayotte is an overseas department of France and just like in mainland France, service is always included in the bill. Further tipping is not expected.
If you do want to show appreciation for good service, you can still round up the bill or leave the change, like you would do in France.

Tipping in Morocco

 

Tipping is common practice in Morocco.

Tipping is usual and customary in Morocco, and most of the time expected, especially from tourists.
Tipping is done in the local currency, the Moroccan Dirham.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge. You can add 20-30 dirhams ($2-$3) on top of this if great service.
Hotel bellboy: 10 dirhams ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 20 dirhams ($2) per day
Spa & Hammam: up to 20% of the bill, never less than 50 dirhams ($5.50)
Metered taxi: round up the fare
Parking/gas attendants: 3-5 dirhams ($0.33-$0.55)
Tour guide: 200-300 dirhams ($22-$33) at the end of the tour
Tour driver: 100-200 dirhams ($10-$20) at the end of the tour

Tipping in Mozambique

 

Tipping is common practice in Mozambique.

Tipping is usual and customary in Mozambique, particularly in the tourism industry. The local currency is the metical (Mtc).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel porter: 80 Mtc ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 80-150 Mtc ($1-$2) per night
Tour guide: 400 Mtc ($5) per person per day
Tour driver: 150-200 Mtc ($2-$3) per person per day.
Private tour guide: 750 Mtc ($10) per person per day
Private tour driver: 400 Mtc ($5) per person per day
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Namibia

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Namibia but much appreciated.

Tipping is voluntary in Namibia but always appreciated and recommended, as wages are low. You can tip in local currency, the Namibian Dollar (N$)
Restaurant: 10% of the bill (but max. 150N$ – 10 USD)
Cafe, bar: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 5N$ ($0.30)
Hotel housekeeper: 5N$ ($0.30) per day
Tour guide: 120N$ ($7) per day

Tipping in Niger

 

Tipping is in Niger is often expected.

Tipping is not exactly an obligation in Niger, but it is customary and most of the time expected.
Restaurant: 10% on top of the 10% service charge
Bartender: 10% on top of the 10% service charge
Hotel bellboy: 500 CFA Francs ($0.90) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1000 CFA Francs ($1.80) per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Tour driver: 5% of the tour cost
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Nigeria

 

Tipping in Nigeria is not mandatory but it is customary.

Tipping is not an obligation in Nigeria but it is customary for tourism-related services and more upscale establishments.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 700 Nairas ($1.80)
Hotel housekeeper: 1500 Nairas ($4) per day
Tour guide: 4000 Nairas ($10) per day
Tour driver: 2000 Nairas ($5) per day
Taxi: no tip expected (fare is negotiated)

Tipping in Réunion Island

 

Tipping is not expected in Réunion Island but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Réunion Island but appreciated and used to reward good service.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill if no service charge was included
Hotel: service charge is included, no tipping needed
Tour guide: 4-5 Euros per person per day
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Rwanda

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Rwanda but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Rwanda but appreciated, and customary for tourism-related services such as tour guides. It is better to tip in local currency (Rwandan Francs).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill (mostly in higher-end restaurants in bigger cities)
Hotel bellboy: 1000 Francs ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1-$2 per day
Trekking Guide: $5 per person per day
Private guide: $5-$10 per person per day
Trek porter: $10 per person per day
Camp staff: $5-$10 per guest per day

Tipping in São Tomé & Principe

 

Tipping is not required in São Tomé and Principe, but it is appreciated.

Tipping is optional in São Tomé and Principe, but it is appreciated as wages are low. You should tip in local currency, the New Dobra (STN). 1 USD = 21 STD.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel porter: 10-20 STN ($0.50-$1)
Hotel housekeeper: 20 STN ($1) per night
Tour guide: 200 STN ($10) per day

Tipping in Senegal

 

Tipping in Senegal is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Senegal, but it is a common and appreciated way of rewarding good service, in more upscale establishments.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge. No tip expected is small, local restaurants.
Hotel porter: 500 CFA Francs ($0.90) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1000 CFA Francs ($1.80) per night
Taxi: no tip expected, the fare should be negociated.
Tour guide: 8000-10,000 CFA Francs ($14-$18) for a full day tour

Tipping in Seychelles

 

Tipping in Seychelles is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Seychelles as a service charge is included in the bill, but it is much appreciated. You should tip in local currency, the Seychellois Rupee (SR).
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Bartender: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel porter: 12 SR ($0.60)
Hotel housekeeper: 10 SR ($0.50) per night
Tour guide: 200 SR ($10) for a full day tour
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Sierra Leone

 

Tipping in Sierra Leone is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is voluntary in Sierra Leone but always much appreciated as wages are low. The local currency is the Leone. $1 = 10,000 Leones.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge. A little extra if great service.
Hotel porter: 1000-2000 Leones ($0.10-$0.20)
Hotel housekeeper: 2000-3000 Leones ($0.20-$0.30)
Tour guide: is it customary to leave a tip at the end of the tour, according to your satisfaction with the tour.

Tipping in Somalia

 

Tipping is common practice in Somalia.

Tipping is customary in Somalia and much appreciated.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Hotel porter: $1
Hotel housekeeper: $1 per night

Tipping in South Africa

 

Tipping is expected in South Africa.

Tipping is customary and expected in South Africa. The local currency is the South African Rand.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel porter: 10 rands ($0.60) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 10-20 rands ($0.60-$1.20) per day
Tour guide: 100 rand ($6) per person per day
Tour driver: 50 rands ($3) per person per day
Private tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in South Sudan

 

Tipping in South Sudan is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping in South Sudan is not mandatory and not too common but it is much appreciated as wages are low.
Tips are more expected for certain services like tour guides.
A tip is called baksheesh in South Sudan. You can tip in local currency, the South Sudanese Pound.
Restaurant: a service charge will be included in the bill. There is no need to tip further.
Hotel bellboy: 130 pounds ($1)
Hotel housekeeper: 130 pounds ($1) per night
Tour guide: 1300 pounds ($10) per day
Tour driver: 1300 pounds ($10) per day

Tipping in Sudan

 

Tipping in Sudan is not mandatory but much appreciated.

Tipping in Sudan is not a requirement but it is highly appreciated as wages are low.
It is sometimes customary and expected, especially from foreigners for tour guides.
A tip is called baksheesh in Sudan. You can tip in local currency, the Sudanese Pound.
Restaurant: a service charge will be included in the bill. There is no need to tip further.
Hotel bellboy: 55 pounds ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 55 pounds ($1) per night
Tour guide: 550 pounds ($10) per day
Tour driver: 550 pounds ($10) per day

Tipping in Swaziland (eSwatini)

 

Tipping is most of the time expected in eSwatini.

Tipping is customary and expected in Swaziland (now renamed eSwatini). Tips are very important to service providers as wages are very low. You can tip in local currency – the Swazi Lilangeni, or in South African Rands. They have the same value.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 10-15 lilangenis/rands ($0.60-$1)
Hotel housekeeper: 15 lilangenis/rands ($1) per night
Taxi: no tip expected (fare should be negociated)
Tour guide: 150-200 lilangenis/rands ($9-$12) for a full day tour

Tipping in Tanzania

 

Tipping in Tanzania is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not expected in Tanzania but it is much appreciated and a common way of rewarding great service. Tip boxes are also very common in camps for example.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$5 per day
Group safari guide:
 $8-$10 per guest per day
Private safari guide: $15-$20 per guest per day
Taxi: no tip or round up the fare

Tipping in Togo

 

Tipping in Togo is not expected but appreciated for tourist services.

Tipping is not expected in Togo but more common with tourism-related activities.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill for a more upscale restaurant
Hotel porter: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80)
Hotel housekeeper: 500-1000 CFA Francs ($0.90-$1.80) per night
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour price

Tipping in Tunisia

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Tunisia, but appreciated and common.

Tipping is not compulsory i Tunisia but customary to reward good service and quite expected in tourism-related services. You should always tip in local currency (dinars).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel porter: 1-2 dinars ($0.35-$0.70) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-2 dinars ($0.35-$0.70) per night
Taxi: tip not expected
Tour guide: tip not necessary, up to 20 dinars if you want to tip.

Tipping in Uganda

 

Tipping in Uganda is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping in Uganda is not compulsory but is becoming more common with the development of tourism.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare
Hotel/lodge staff: $5-10 per person
Tour/safari guide: $10-$20 per day per person

Tipping in Western Sahara

 

Tipping is not expected in Western Sahara, but appreciated.

Tipping is not expected but you can always tip if the service was good.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if the service charge is not already included.
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Zambia

 

Tipping in Zambia is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping in Zambia is not expected or mandatory, but always much appreciated, especially if the usual 10% service charge is not included.
Restaurant : 10% of the bill
Safari & camp staff: $5-$10 per day per guest
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Zimbabwe

 

Tipping is expected in Zimbabwe.

Tipping in Zimbabwe is usually expected, especially for tourism-related services.
Restaurant waiter: 10% of the bill
Safari guide: $10-$15 per day
Hotel staff: $5
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag

Americas

Tipping in Anguilla

 

Tipping is usually expected in Anguilla.

It is customary to give tips in Anguilla, but check if a service charge has already been applied. If it has, tipping is up to you.
Restaurant: 5% of the bill if service charge was applied, otherwise 15% of the bill.
Taxi: 10% of the bill
Hotel/Airport porter: $1-2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $3-5 per day

Tipping in Antigua & Barbuda

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Antigua & Barbuda but common and appreciated.

A 10% service charge is usually added on the bill in Antigua and Barbuda, any extra tip is voluntary, but common.
Restaurant: if service charge included, an extra 5%. If not, 15% of the bill
Taxi: 10% of the bill
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1-$2 per day

Tipping in Argentina

 

Tipping in Argentina is not expected, but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Argentina but it is a great way to show appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Tour guide: 10-20% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare / keep the change
Hotel bellboy / housekeeper: a few pesos
Spa: 10-20% of the bill if great service

Tipping in Aruba

 

Tipping in Aruba is not expected, but appreciated.

In Aruba, a 10-15% service charge is usually added on any food/drink bill. You can tip more if service was good.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill if service charge, 15-20% of the bill if no service charge.
Hotel staff: $1-$2
Taxi: 10% of the bill

Tipping in the Bahamas

 

Tipping in the Bahamas is usually expected.

It is customary for tourists to tip in the Bahamas. A 15% service charge is usually added in restaurants and hotels.
Restaurant: 5% of the bill on top of the service charge
Hotel/Aiport porter: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1-$3 per day
Taxi: 10-15% of the bill
Bartender: $1-$2 per drink

Tipping in Barbados

 

Tipping in Barbados in not mandatory but appreciated.

A 10-15% service charge is most of the time added to restaurant and hotel bills in Barbados, you are free to tip extra if service was good.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2 per day

Tipping in Belize

 

Tipping in Belize in not mandatory but appreciated.

It is not mandatory to tip in Belize but common and appreciated, especially for tourism-related services.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Spa, hairdresser: 10-15% of the bill
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare
Tour guide: 10-15% of the tour price
Hotel: a 10% service charge is often added to the bill, you can add 5-10% extra tip for the porters and housekeepers.

Tipping in Bermuda

 

Tipping is expected in Bermuda, but in many occasions already included.

Tipping is expected and most of the time automatic in Bermuda. A 15-17% service charge is most of the time included in the bill, and you do not need to give any additional tip.
However, if the the service charge was not included, you need to tip.
Restaurant: 15% of the bill
Bar: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag (always expected)
Hotel housekeeper: $1-$2 per day

Tipping in Bolivia

 

Tipping in Bolivia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not deeply rooted in the Bolivian culture but it is always appreciated, to show appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel staff: 5-10 bolivianos / $1-2 when they help you with something
Tour driver: 10% of the price (for the group)
Tour/trek guide: $10-$20 per day (for the group)

Tipping in Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba

 

Tipping is usually expected in Bonaire.

Tipping in Bonaire is very common and expected. Sometimes, restaurant include a 10-15% service charge to the bill, tipping is then up to you.
Restaurant: 10-15%, if the service charge was not added
Dive shops, dive master: 10% of the bill
Taxi: 10% of the bill
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel staff: $1-$5

Tipping in Brazil

 

Tipping in Brazil is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping in Brazil is not mandatory and is not really part of the culture. However, the tip sometimes already included in the bill at the restaurant as a service charge. Any extra tipping is much appreciated as a reward for good service. some service providers such as porters are used to receiving tips and will expect them.
Restaurant: a 10% service charge is often included, you can add 10% if service was great
Hotel porter: 5 reais ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5-10 reais ($1-$2) per night
Group tour guide: 25-30 reais ($5) per person
Private tour guide: 50-55 reais ($10)
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Canada

 

Tipping is expected in Canada.

Tipping is usual and expected in Canada, like it is in the United States.
Restaurant: 15-20%
Bartender: $1-$2 per drink | 15-20% if table service
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$3 per night
Hotel concierge: $10-$20
Other hotel staff: $1-$2 for any service/help received
Tour guide/driver: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: 10-20% of the fare

Tipping in the Cayman Islands

 

Tipping is customary and expected in the Cayman Islands.

Tipping is usual and expected in the Cayman Islands. At the restaurant, a 15% service charge is usually included but feel free to tip extra for good service.
Restaurant: 15% if no service charge, round up the bill or add a few dollars if great service.
Bartender: $1 per drink
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1-$2 per night
Taxi: 10-15% of the fare
Tour guide / Boat crew: $5-$15 per person per day

Tipping in Chile

 

Tipping in Chile is not mandatory, but most of the time expected.

Tipping is not a legal requirement, but it is most of the time expected. Tips are very important to complement usually low wages.
Restaurant: a 10% service charge is most of the time included, you can tip 5-10% extra if service was great.
Hotel staff: 500-1000 pesos (around $1)
Hotel porter: 1000 pesos ($1) per bag
Taxi: round up the fare
Trekking guide: 10-15,000 pesos (12-18 USD) per day for the whole group

Tipping in Colombia

 

Tipping in Colombia is not expected but common and appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Colombia, as a 10% service charge “Propina voluntaria” is often included in the bill. You are free to tip more for good service.
Restaurant: no tip is expected on top of the service charge, but you round up the bill if service was great
Bartender: again the service charge is often included, you have add $0.50-$1 per drink, if great service
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2 per night
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare
Tour guide/driver: 5-10% of the tour price

Tipping in Costa Rica

 

Tipping is not expected in Costa Rica but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Costa Rica but it is appreciated. It is common to tip if you received good service.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill on top of the included service charge | 15-20% of the bill if no service charge was added
Bartender: 100-200 Colones ($0.20-$0.40) per drink
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2 per day
Tour guide: $10 per day per person
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Cuba

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Cuba but most of the time expected.

Tipping is not a requirement in Cuba but it is very common and most of the time expected, especially from tourists. Tip in Convertible Cuban Pesos (CUC). 1 CUC = 1 USD
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1 CUC per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1 CUC per night
Tour guide: 2-5 CUC per person per day
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Curaçao

 

Tipping in Curaçao is not compulsory but it is customary.

Tipping is voluntary in Curaçao but much appreciated, customary and most of the time expected from tourists.
You can tip in the local currency, the Netherlands Antillean Guilder (ANG).
Restaurant: a 10% service charge is typically added. Feel free to tip 5 to 10% extra for good service
Hotel: a 12% charge is automatically added to the bill.
Hotel bellboy: 1 ANG ($0.56) per bag
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Dominica

 

Tipping is commonplace in Dominica.

Tipping is customary and most of the time expected from tourists in Dominica. If the 10% service charge is already included, you don’t necessarily need to tip further.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Bar: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1-$2 per night
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide/driver: 10% of the tour price if no service charge

Tipping in the Dominican Republic

 

Tipping is not mandatory but very appreciated in the Dominican Republic.

Tipping is not really a requirement in the Dominican Republic but they are particularly appreciated as wages are usually very low.
Restaurant: 10-20% of the bill depending on the service charge being included or not
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1-$2 per night
Tour guide: $25 per day
Tour driver: $10 per day
Spa: 10-20% of the bill
Taxi: 10% of the fare if service charge not already included

Tipping in Ecuador

 

Tipping in Ecuador is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Ecuador but it is an appreciated way of showing appreciation for good service. In upscale restaurants, a 12% tax and a 10% service charge are already included in the bill.
Restaurant: 5-10% if no service charge
Bartender: 5% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1 per night
Group tour guide: $5 per person per day
Group tour driver: $2-$3 per person per day
Private tour guide: $10 per day
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in El Salvador

 

Tipping is customary and most of the time expected in El Salvador.

Tipping is part of the culture in El Salvador and is very usual. Most of the time, tips are expected.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Tour guide: $2 per person or more. They strongly rely on tips.
Taxi: tip not expected or round up the fare if exceptional service

Tipping in the Falkland Islands (Malvinas)

 

Tipping is not expected in the Falkland Islands.

Tipping is not part of the culture and expected in the Falkland Islands. If you really want to reward great service, you can still tip up to 5% or round up the bill.

Tipping in French Guiana

 

Tipping is not expected in French Guiana.

Tipping is not part of the culture in French Guiana, it is not customary and not expected.

Tipping in Greenland

 

Tipping in Greenland is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is originally not very customary in Greenland and it is not expected. A service charge is generally included in most services. If service was particularly good, you are free to tip further, usually by rounding up the bill or leaving small change. It will be appreciated.

Tipping in Grenada

 

Tipping in Grenada is not compulsory but customary.

Tipping is very common in Grenada and most of the time expected.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge included
Bartender: 10% of the bill if no service charge included
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$3 per night
Tour guide/boat trip: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: 10-15% of the fare

Tipping in Guadeloupe

 

Tipping in Guadeloupe is not common practice.

Tipping is voluntary in Guadeloupe. Like in mainland France, a 10-15% service charge is included in the bill, and no further tipping is expected.
You can still tip further if you are satisfied with the service.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Bartender: 5-10% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Guatemala

 

Tipping in Guatemala is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not an obligation in Guatemala but it is always appreciated as wages are low. It is becoming more and more commonplace with the development of tourism. Tipping is a little more expected/usual in upscale establishments.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge (“propina”)
Bar: 10% of the bill if no service charge (“propina”)
Hotel bellboy: 7-15 Quetzals ($1-$2)
Hotel housekeeper: 7-15 Quetzals ($1-$2) per night
Tour guide: $5-$10 per person per day
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Guyana

 

Tipping is not really expected in Guyana.

Tipping is not part of the culture in Guyana and it is not expected. You can round up your taxi fare or leave small change to the hotel staff if you really want to.

Tipping in Haiti

 

Tipping in Haiti is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not particularly customary in Haiti but it is always appreciated, and more common from tourists.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill, in more upscale restaurants. No tip exected in small local restaurants.
Hotel bellboy: 70 Gourdes ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 70-150 Gourdes ($1-$2) per night
Taxi: tip not expected

Tipping in Honduras

 

Tipping in Honduras is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Honduras but it is fairly common in the tourism industry and always appreciated. A 10% service charge is sometimes included in upscale restaurants.
Restaurant: round up the bill
Bar: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1 per night
Tour guide: $10 per person for a full day tour
Tour driver: $5 per person for a full day tour
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Jamaica

 

Tipping is common and often expected in Jamaica.

Tipping is common practice in the touristy areas of Jamaica and it is most of the time expected from tourists. Outside of these areas, it is less common.
Restaurant: 15-20% of the bill if no service charge | 5-10% on top of service charge
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1-$2 per night
Tour guide: 10-20% of the tour price
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Martinique

 

Tipping in Martinique is not common practice.

Tipping in Martinique is not required or expected – as in mainland France, 10-15% service charges are included in the bill. However, you can still tip if you want to, to show appreciation for any great service.
Restaurant: round up the bill if great service
Bartender: tip not expected
Hotel staff: tipping not expected, a 10% service charge is added to the bill
Taxi: tip not expected, round up the fare if great service

Tipping in Mexico

 

Tipping is customary in Mexico.

Tipping is very common and most of the time expected in Mexico, even though a service charge (propina) is sometimes added to the bill.
U.S. Dollars are sometimes accepted but it is better to tip in pesos, the local currency.
Restaurant: 15% of the bill if no service charge – 20% for exceptional service
Bartender: 10-20 pesos per round or 15% of the bill if table service
Hotel bellboy: 20 pesos ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 20-50 pesos ($1-$2.50) per night
Spa: 15% of the bill if no service charge
Tour guide: 50-70 pesos ($2.50-$3.50) per person per day | 15-20% of the tour cost for smaller tours
Taxi: round up the fare if help with luggage

Tipping in Montserrat

 

Tipping in Montserrat is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping on Montserrat island is not a requirement but it is appreciated. Check if a service charge has been applied to the bill first. Tipping is better done in the local currency, the East Caribbean Dollar (EC$).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 2-3 EC$ ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5 EC$ ($1.85) per night
Taxi: no tip expected

Tipping in Nicaragua

 

Tipping in Nicaragua is common and often expected.

Tipping is commonplace in Nicaragua and is most of the time expected, particularly from tourists.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 25 Cordobas ($0.70) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 25 Cordobas ($0.70) per day
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Tour driver: 5% of the tour cost
Taxi: no tip expected.

Tipping in Panama

 

Tipping in Panama is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not compulsory in Panama, but it is appreciated and a customary way of showing appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$3 per night
Tour Guide: $10 per day
Tour driver: $5 per day
Taxi: no tip expected, or round up the fare

Tipping in Paraguay

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Paraguay but customary and expected.

Tipping is not compulsory in Paraguay but common and expected from foreigners for many tourism-related services, especially in higher-end establishments.
Restaurant: round up the bill in small restaurants, 10% of the bill in high-end restaurants
Hotel porter: 5,000-10,000 Guaranis ($0.70-$1.50) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 10,000 Guaranis ($1.50) per day
Tour guide: 10,000-30,000 Guaranis ($1.50-$4)
Bars: tip not expected or leave small change
Taxi: tip not expected or round up the fare

Tipping in Peru

 

Tipping in Peru is not mandatory but customary and expected from foreigners.

Even though it is not compulsory, tipping in Peru is customary and most of the time expected in tourism-related services, and in higher-end hotels/restaurants. Tips are less expected in lower-end places.
Tipping is best done in Soles, the local currency.
Restaurant: 10-15% (high-end restaurant). Tip less expected in small local restaurants.
Hotel bellboy: 3 Soles ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-3 Soles per person per day
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare
Trek guide: 20-30 Soles ($7-$10) per per day
Trek porter/cook: 10-15 Soles ($3-$5) per day
Private tour driver: 10-15 Soles ($3-$5)

Tipping in Puerto Rico

 

Tipping is expected in Puerto Rico.

Tipping in Puerto Rico is expected, and follows the same rules as in the United States.
Restaurant: 15-20% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$5 per day
Bartender: $1 per drink
Taxi: 15% of the fare

Tipping in Saint Barthélemy

 

Tipping in Saint Barthélemy is not mandatory but common practice.

Saint Barthélemy is part of France and just like in France, tipping is technically not expected (a service charge is included in the bill), but tipping is still customary on the island.
The service charge is 15% in restaurants, and 10-15% in hotels.
You can tip in Euros or in U.S. Dollars.
Airport greeter: 20 Euros / $20
Restaurant: 5-10% on top of the service charge if great service
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro /$1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 2-3 Euros / $2-$3 per night
Luxury villa staff: 10-15 Euros per day
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Saint Kitts & Nevis

 

Tipping in St. Kitts & Nevis is common practice.

Tipping is usual and customary in Saint Kitts & Nevis. A 10-15% service charge is included in the bill at the restaurant, it is up to you if you want to tip a little extra.
Restaurant: 10-15% if no service charge
Bartender: $1 per round
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2 per night
Taxi: 10-15% of the fare
Tour guide: 10-15% of the tour cost

Tipping in Saint Lucia

 

Tipping is customary and expected in St. Lucia.

Tipping is usual and most of the time expected in Saint Lucia. You can tip in local currency, the East Caribbean Dollar (EC$), US Dollars are also generally accepted.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill if no service charge. If service was great, add a few dollars on top of the service charge.
Bartender: 10% of the bill if no service charge.
Hotel bellboy: 2-3 EC$ ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5 EC$ ($1.85) per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Saint Martin (French part)

 

Tipping is often expected in Saint Martin.

Saint Martin (the French part of the island) officially follows the European way of tipping – with the service charge included, whereas Sint Maarten (the Dutch part of the island) follows the American way. However, extra tips are still common and quite expected in the French part as well.
Restaurant: a service charge will be included in the bill, tip 3-5% extra if great service.
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 2 Euros per night
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Saint Pierre & Miquelon

 

Tipping is common in St. Pierre & Miquelon for certain services.

Tipping is not mandatory in St.Pierre & Miquelon but it is common and expected for certain services, like in Canada. You can tip in Euros or in Canadian Dollars.
Restaurant: 15-20% of the bill
Bar: 15-20% of the bill
Hotel staff: tip not expected
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

 

Tipping is customary in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

Tipping is customary and much appreciated in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. A 10% service charge is most of the time included in the bill at the restaurant, it is up to you if you want to tip a little extra.
Restaurant: 10-15% if no service charge
Bartender: $1 per round
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$3 per night
Taxi: 10% of the fare
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Sint Maarten (Dutch part)

 

Tipping is expected in the Dutch part of Sint Maarten.

Sint Maarten (the Dutch part of the island) follows the American way of tipping, whereas Saint Martin (the French part) follows the European way.
As a result, tipping is required in Sint Maarten.
Restaurant: the tipping policy of some restaurants can be confusing, don’t hesitate to ask what service charge is included, if this charge goes to the waiter or not, and how much you are expected to tip. 15% of the bill is standard.
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$3 per night
Taxi: $1

Tipping in Suriname

 

Tipping is not common and not expected in Suriname.

Tipping is not really part of the culture in Suriname and it is not expected. You can still give small change or round prices up if you want to.

Tipping in Trinidad & Tobago

 

Tipping in Trinidad & Tobago is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not really part of the culture in Trinidad and Tobago but it is becoming quite common with the development of tourism, and always appreciated.
Restaurant: 10 to 15% if a service charge was not included. The local currency is the Trinidad & Tobago Dollar (TT$).
Taxi: no tip required
Hotel housekeeper: TT$15 ($2) per night
Hotel bellboy: TT$7 ($1) per bag

Tipping in the Turks & Caicos Islands

 

Tipping is expected in the Turks and Caicos Islands.

Tipping is expected in the Turks & Caicos Islands. If the 10% service charge has been applied (hotel & restaurant), you can tip 5% extra. If it has not, tip 15% of the bill.
Restaurant: 15% of the bill
Taxi: 10% of the bill
Hotel staff: a 10% service charge is applied to the bill, as a base tip to share among the employees. Fell free to tip extra for good service.
Tour guide: 10-20% of the tour cost

Tipping in the United States of America

 

Tipping is expected in the United States.

Tipping is cultural, and very much expected in the US, as tips represent a big chunk of the waiters’ salaries.
For any personal service you receive in the US, you are expected to tip.
Restaurant: 15-20% of the bill, even 25% if great service.
Taxi: 15% of the bill
Bellboys: $1-$2 per bag
Food delivery person: 10% of the bill
Hairdresser, spa…: 15% of the bill
Hotel housekeeper: a few follars per day
Bar: $1-$2 per drink

Tipping in Uruguay

 

Tipping in Uruguay is not mandatory but much appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory but quite common and apreciated in Uruguay, especially if the usual 10% service charge was not included in the price.
Restaurant & cafe: 10% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare
Street parking and petrol station attendants: 5-10 pesos ($0.10-$0.20)
Hotel bellboy: 40 pesos ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 40 pesos ($1) per day

Tipping in Venezuela

 

Tipping in Venezuela is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping in Venezuela is not mandatory but quite common and appreciated. Most services already include a 5-10% service charge, but you are free to tip this same amount if it was not included. If the service was great, feel free to tip on top of the service charge.
Restaurant: 5-10%
Hotel staff: $1
Hotel bellboy: $1 per bag
Taxi: tip not expected, or round up the fare
Tour / trek guides: tip is more expected, 10%

Tipping in the British Virgin Islands

 

Tipping is not mandatory but appreciated in the British Virgin Islands.

Tipping is not mandatory in the British Virgin Islands but customary if no service charge is included and/or if service was good.
Restaurant & most services: 15-20% of the bill if no service charge.

Tipping in the U.S. Virgin Islands

 

Tipping is expected in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Tipping is expected in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
Restaurant: 15% of the bill, or more if service was great.
Taxi: $1-$2
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2 per night

Europe

Tipping in the Åland Islands

 

Tipping is not customary in the Åland Islands.

The Åland Islands are an autonomous region of Finland and just like in mainland Finland, tipping is not really expected.

Tipping in Albania

 

Tipping in Albania is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping in Albania is not required but it is slowly becoming more common with the development of tourism in the country.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 100-200 Leks ($1-$2)
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Andorra

 

Tipping is not really expected in Andorra.

Tipping is not very customary in Andorra and most of the time tips are not expected.
Restaurants: they already include a 10% service charge. You are not expected to tip, but you can do so if service was very good, by rounding up the bill.

Tipping in Austria

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Austria but customary and expected for certain services.

Even though it is not compulsory, tipping in Austria is very customary and often expected in tourism-related services, and follows specific rules.
Restaurant: a 10% service charge is sometimes included. You should tip 10% of the bill, but don’t leave it on the table. It should be given directly to the waiter with a “Danke” (thank you) so they know they can keep the change.
Cafe: 10% of the bill
Bartender: round up the bill, again to be given to the bartender directly with a “Danke”.
Hotel porter: 1-2 Euros per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-2 Euros per day
Taxi: 10% of the fare
Tour guide: 5-10 Euros

Tipping in Belarus

 

Tipping is not expected in Belarus but acceptable.

Tipping is not common practice and not expected in Belarus. If you absolutely want to tip, you can leave small change at the restaurant, to the hotel staff or your tour guide/driver.

Tipping in Belgium

 

Tipping is not expected in Belgium, but acceptable.

Tipping is not so common in Belgium because most services such as restaurants and hotels include a 10-15% service charge in the bill, and no further tipping is expected.
If you do feel service was great, you can leave a few Euros or round up the bill.

Tipping in Bosnia & Herzegovina

 

Tipping is not compulsory but customary and expected in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Tipping is not mandatory in Bosnia and Herzegovina, but it is common practice and most of the time expected.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Bartender: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1 Bosnian Mark ($0.60) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1 Bosnian Mark ($0.60) per day
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price

Tipping in Bulgaria

 

Tipping is not compulsory but customary and expected in Bulgaria.

Tipping is not mandatory in Bulgaria, but it is common practice and most of the time expected.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Bartender: 5-10% of the bill if someone took your order
Hotel bellboy: 1.5 Lev ($0.90) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1 Lev ($0.60) per day
Taxi: 10% of the fare
Tour guide/Tour driver: 10% of the tour price

Tipping in Croatia

 

Tipping is not expected in Croatia but appreciated.

Tipping is not expected in croatia and not really part of the culture, but it is still appreciated and becoming more more common for tourism-related services.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill (quite expected)
Bartender: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: 15 kunas ($2.35)
Hotel housekeeper: 15 kunas ($2.35) per day
Tour guide: 10-15 kunas ($1.5-$2.35) per person
Spa: 10-20% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Cyprus

 

Tipping is not really expected in Cyprus.

Tipping is not common practice in Cyprus, and it is not expected.
Restaurants include a 10% service charge to the bill.
If you do want to tip, here are some guidelines:
Restaurant: 2-3 Euros on top of the service charge.
Hotel bellboy/ housekeeper: a couple Euros
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Czech Republic

 

Tipping is most of the time expected in Czech Republic.

Tipping is customary and expected in Czech Republic, particularly for tourism-related services. However, outside of the major, touristic cities, tipping is much less expected.
Restaurant: If the 10% service charge was not included to the bill, tip 10-15% of the bill. If it is included, you can tip 5% extra or round up the bill.
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 20-25 Czech crowns (about $1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 20-25 Czech crowns (about $1) per night
Taxi: round up the fare or 5%

Tipping in Denmark

 

Tipping is not usually expected in Denmark.

Tipping is not common practice in Denmark, and is generally not expected. A 10% service charge is included in the bill and there is no need to tip further.
However, if service was exceptional, feel free to tip further, adding another 5% to the restaurant bill, or rounding up the taxi fare.

Tipping in Estonia

 

Tipping is not really expected in Estonia.

Tipping is not part of the culture in Estonia and it is a new concept in this country. As a result, tips are rarely expected. If you really want to tip because you received great service, here are some guidelines:
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel staff: no tip expected
Tour guides: 5-10% of the tour price

Tipping in the Faroe Islands

 

Tipping is not expected in the Faroe Islands.

Tipping is not part of the culture in the Faroe Islands, and is not expected. A service charge will be included in your bill. If you absolutely want to tip, just round up the bill.

Tipping in Finland

 

Tipping is not really expected in Finland.

Tipping is not an expectation in Finland and it is not even too common, as a service charge is often included.
If you are particularly please with the service, you can still tip by leaving a few Euros or rounding up the bill.

Tipping in France

 

Tipping in France is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in France but tips are always appreciated. Tips should be a way of showing appreciation for good service only.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Cafe: round up the bill or a few Euros
Bartender: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-2 Euros per night
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 5 Euros per person per day

Tipping in Germany

 

Tipping is customary and often expected in Germany.

Tipping is usual in Germany and most of the time expected and always appreciated. But you need to follow the local etiquette.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill. Tell the waiter how much you wish to pay, including your tip. Hand the cash to the waiter directly, don’t leave it on the table.
Bartender: 10% of the bill, same procedure as in restaurants. Don’t leave it on the table/bar.
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 3-5 Euros per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Gibraltar

 

Tipping in Gibraltar is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping in Gibraltar follows similar rules as in the UK – it is not required but appreciated. It is a common way of rewarding good service. A 10% service charge is often included, you can still tip further is service was great.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1 Pound per bag
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Greece

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Greece but it is customary.

Tipping is not an obligation but it is very common and most of the time expected from tourists.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill, left on the table or given to the waiter
Cafe, bar: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1 Euro per day
Group tour guide: 2-5 Euros per person per day
Private tour guide: 20 Euros per person per day

Tipping in Guernsey

 

Tipping in Guernsey is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is voluntary in Guernsey. You can tip good service and if no service charge is already included.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Bar: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy, housekeeper: small change
Taxi: tip not expected

Tipping in Holy See (Vatican)

 

As in the rest of Italy, tipping is not expected but appreciated in Vatican.

Tipping is not expected in Italy but appreciated. You can tip if you receive really good service but it is not an obligation. If you do want to tip, here are some general guidelines:
Restaurant: round up the bill / a few Euros. Sometimes a service charge is already included.
Bartender: tip not expected
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1 Euro per day
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare
Tour guide: 10 Euros for a full day tour

Tipping in Hungary

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Hungary, but often expected from tourists.

Tipping is not a requirement in Hungary, but it is appreciated, common and often expected for tourism-related services. You can tip in the local currency, the Hungarian Forint (HUF). You don’t need to tip if service was bad.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge, given to the waiter
Hotel bellboy: 500-1000 HUF ($1.5-$3) per bag
Hotel concierge: 1000-2000 HUF ($3-$6) for any special service
Hotel housekeeper: 500 HUF ($1.5) per night
Taxi: 10% of the fare
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Iceland

 

Tipping is usually not expected in Iceland.

Tipping is not customary and not expected in Iceland. A service charge is included in the bill and there is no need to tip further. You can round up the bill for exceptional service.

Tipping in Ireland

 

Tipping is common practice in Ireland.

Tipping is not mandatory in Ireland but very common and usual. Tipping is usually done to show appreciation for good service, feel free to not tip bad service.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill if no service charge
Pub, cafe: round up the bill
Bar: 1-2 Euros if table service or large order at the bar. A tip per drink is not expected.
Hotel bellboy: 2-5 Euros in total
Hotel housekeeper: 1-2 Euros per day
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 10 Euros per person per day

Tipping on the Isle of Man

 

Tipping is not expected but appreciated on the Isle of Man.

Tipping on the Isle of Man follows similar rules as in the UK. It is not expected but appreciated, and a 10-15% service charge is often included in the bill.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 1 Pound per bag
Pub: no tip expected
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Italy

 

Tipping is not expected and not too common in Italy, but appreciated.

Tipping is not expected in Italy but appreciated. You can tip if you receive really good service but it is not an obligation. If you do want to tip, here are some general guidelines:
Restaurant: round up the bill / a few Euros. Sometimes a service charge is already included.
Bartender: tip not expected
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1 Euro per day
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare
Tour guide: 10 Euros for a full day tour

Tipping in Jersey

 

Tipping in Jersey is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is voluntary in Jersey. You can tip good service and if no service charge is already included.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Bar: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy, housekeeper: small chage
Taxi: tip not expected

Tipping in Latvia

 

Tipping in Latvia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Latvia but it is becoming more common with the development of tourism in the country, and is appreciated.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Bar: 5-10% if you see a tip box
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 Euros
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: a few euros at the end of the tour

Tipping in Liechtenstein

 

Tipping is not expected in Liechtenstein.

Tipping is not common practice and not expected in Liechtenstein. A service charge is already included for more services and there is no need to tip further.
You can still leave small change or round up the taxi fare if great service.

Tipping in Lithuania

 

Tipping is not expected in Lithuania, but appreciated.

Tipping is generally not very common in Lithuania and not expected, but it is a nice way of showing appreciation if you received great service.
Restaurant: 5-10% if no service charge
Bar: a few coins if you see a tip jar
Hotel staff: no tip expected
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare
Tour guide: up to 10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Luxembourg

 

Tipping is common practice in Luxembourg.

Tipping is more common and customary than in other parts of Europe, and it is often expected in the tourism industry and more high-end establishments.
Restaurant: a 15% service charge is included in the bill. You can tip a few Euros extra in small restaurants, or 10% further in upscale restaurants.
Bar: a 15% service charge is included, you can tip a few euros extra or round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 Euros per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 2-3 Euros per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: 10% of the fare

Tipping in Macedonia

 

Tipping in Macedonia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Macedonia but it is appreciated as wages are low. You should tip in local currency, the Macedonian Denar (MKD).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel porter: 10-20 MKD ($0.20-$0.40) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 20 MKD ($0.40) per night
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost
Taxi: no tip expected, up to 10% of the fare if exceptional service like help with a lot of baggage.

Tipping in Malta

 

Tipping is customary in Malta.

Tipping is not exactly mandatory in Malta but it is very usual and customary. A 10% service charge is most of the time included in the bill in hotels and restaurants. In these places, tipping is up to you.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill if no service charge. Leave the change if good service.
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 Euros per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 2-3 Euros per night
Hotel room service: 1-2 Euros
Spa: 5-10% of the bill if no service charge
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Moldova

 

Tipping is commonplace in Moldova.

Tipping is not a requirement but it is becoming more and more common in Moldova and it is often expected, especially in the tourism industry. The local currency is the Moldovan Leu (plural: Lei).
Restaurant & Bar: 5-10% on top of the service charge
Hotel bellboy: 10-20 lei ($0.60-$1.20) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 20-30 lei ($1.20-$1.80) per night
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Monaco

 

Tipping is customary in Monaco.

Tipping is customary and most of the time expected in Monaco.
Restaurant: 15% of the bill if no service charge
Bar: 15% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 Euros per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-2 Euros per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare

Tipping in Montenegro

 

Tipping is common in Montenegro and often expected from tourists.

Tipping is becoming increasingly common in Montenegro, as the country’s tourism industry is growing.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Bar: up to 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-2 Euros per night
Taxi: 5-10% of the fare
Tour guide/driver: 5-10% of the tour cost

Tipping in the Netherlands

 

Tipping in the Netherlands is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is voluntary in the Netherlands. A service charge is often included, but it is quite common to tip for great service.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Cafe, bar: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 Euros per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-2 Euros per night
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: no tip expected or a few Euros if great service

Tipping in Norway

 

Tipping in Norway is not expected but appreciated for certain services.

Tipping is never compulsory and not too common in Norway, a service charge will be included.
But you can still show appreciation for great service.
Restaurant: round up the bill, or 5% of the bill
Bar, cafe: round up the bill
Hotel staff: tipping in hotels in not part of the culture.
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: tip not expected

Tipping in Poland

 

Tipping in Poland is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping in Poland is not a requirement but it should reflect the quality of the sevice. If you don’t tip, nobody will run after you but they will assume the service was not good enough. Tips should be given in local currency (zloty).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel porter: 5 zl ($1.30) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 10 zl ($2.50) per day
Tour guide: 10-15% of the tour price
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Portugal

 

Tipping in Portugal is not mandatory but appreciated.

It is not a requirement to tip in Portugal but it is always appreciated, and quite customary in the tourism industry to reward good service.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Tapas bar, cafe, bartender: round up the price / a few Euros
Hotel porter: 1-2 Euros per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-2 Euros per day
Tour guides/drivers: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Romania

 

Tipping is usually expected in Romania.

Tipping is not exactly mandatory in Romania, but it is very customary and most of the time expected. However, feel free to not tip any bad service. It is better to tip in the local currency (Romanian Leu).
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Bartender: 10-20% of the bill
Hairdresser, spa: 10% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare
Hotel porter: 5 Lei ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5 Lei ($1) per day
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price

Tipping in San Marino

 

Tipping in San Marino is not required but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in San marino but it is appreciated.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge.
Bartender: tip not expected
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1 Euro per day
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare
Tour guide: 5-10 Euros for a full day tour

Tipping in Serbia

 

Tipping in Serbia is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping in Serbia is not mandatory but appreciated and quite common in the tourism industry. You should tip in cash and in the local currency, the Serbian Dinar.
Restaurant: a 10% service charge is sometimes included in the bill. If no service charge, tip 10-15% of the bill.
Cafe: round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: 100 dinars ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 100 dinars ($1) per night
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide/driver: a few hundred dinars at the end of the tour if you had a good time

Tipping in Slovakia

 

Tipping in Slovakia is not expected, but appreciated.

Tipping is not a very common practice in Slovakia and it is not an expectation. However, when you do tip, it is appreciated.
Be careful when you say thank you in Slovakia. The server will then understand that the whole change is his tip, no matter how big it is. Instead, you can tell him how much you want to pay including his tip when handing him the money, or wait for the change before tipping.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge, given directly to the server
Bar: 5-10% of the bill if table service
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag, if you want to
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: a few euros at the end of the tour, if you want to

Tipping in Slovenia

 

Tipping in Slovenia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not particularly common in Slovenia but always appreciated. The most common place to tip in Slovenia is at the restaurant.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1 Euro per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 2 Euros per night
Taxi: 1-2 Euros
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Spain

 

Tipping in Spain is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not a big thing in the Spanish culture but it is a good way of showing appreciation for good service, especially in upscale establishments.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge, given directly to the waiter (upscale restaurant). | Round up the bill or 5% of the bill in smaller restaurants.
Bartender: tip not expected or round up the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 Euros per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 2-5 Euros per night
Hotel concierge: 5-10 Euros if great service
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: Tip not expected, 5-10 Euros per person per day if great service
Private tour guide: 20 Euros per day

Tipping in Svalbard

 

Tipping is not expected in Svalbard, but appreciated.

Like for the rest of Norway, tipping is not a requirement and not too customary, as a service charge will be included.
But you can still show appreciation for great service.
Restaurant: round up the bill, or 5% of the bill
Bar, cafe: round up the bill
Hotel staff: tipping in hotels in not part of the culture.
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: tip not expected

Tipping in Sweden

 

Tipping in Sweden is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not required in Sweden but you can show appreciation for great service by leaving a tip, often by rounding up the price.
Restaurant: round up the bill, or 10% of the bill if great service
Bartender: round up the bill
Hotel staff: tips not expected, or small change
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: tips not expected, or round up the price

Tipping in Switzerland

 

Tipping is usually not expected in Switzerland.

Tipping is not necessary in Switzerland as a service charge is always included in the price and there is no need to tip further. If you do want to reward good service, rounding up the price is the way to go.

Tipping in Ukraine

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Ukraine, but appreciated.

Tipping is not really part of the Ukrainian culture, but got more common with the development of tourism.
Restaurant & bar: 10% of the bill is usual
Taxi: no tip expected, small tip or round up the fare if bad traffic
Beauty salons & spas: 10% of the bill
Hotel: tip not really expected

Tipping in the United Kingdom

 

Tipping in the UK is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in the UK, but appreciated, especially if the usual 10-15% service charge was not included in the bill. You should then tip this amount.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1 Pound per bag
Pub: no tip expected
Taxi: round up the fare

Asia-Pacific

Tipping in Afghanistan

 

Tipping in Afghanistan is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not an expectation in Afghanistan but it is always appreciated. It often consists in leaving some small change in the local currency, Afghanis.
Restaurant: 20 Afghanis ($0.25)
Hotel bellboy: 30 Afghanis ($0.30)
Hotel housekeeper: 100 Afghanis for the whole stay ($1.30)
Historical site staff: 30 Afghanis ($0.30)
Tour guide: $10-$20
Taxi: no tip expected

Tipping in American Samoa

 

Tipping is not really expected in American Samoa.

Tipping is not part of the culture in American Samoa and officially, it is not expected. However, as more American Samoans get to spend some time in the U.S., they are slowly bringing back the tipping culture with them. As a result, if you do choose to tip, it will be accepted.

Tipping in Armenia

 

Tipping in Armenia is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Armenia but it is appreciated, and more commonly practiced in the capital city, Yerevan. It is getting more common with the development of tourism.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Bartender: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel porter: small change
Taxi: round up the fare (expected)

Tipping in Australia

 

Tipping in Australia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is totally voluntary in Australia. Wages are high and people working in the service industry do not depend on tips. It doesn’t mean they are not appreciated, if great service was received.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Bartender: round up the bill
Hotel staff: no tip expected, or a few dollars if a specific extra service was received.
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Azerbaijan

 

Tipping is unusual and not expected in Azerbaijan.

Tipping is not common practice in Azerbaijan and most of the time, no tip is expected.
At the restaurant, a service charge is already included in the bill and no extra tip is expected.
You can still leave a tip for any exceptional service you are given. If you absolutely want to tip, here are some guidelines:
Restaurant: you can tip 10% if the service charge is not included
Hotel porter: you can tip 5 manats ($3)
Tour guide: you can tip 5 manats ($3)
Taxi: you can round up the fare.

Tipping in Bahrain

 

Tipping in Bahrain is customary and expected.

It is usual and expected to tip in Bahrain. Usually, in hotels and restaurant, a 10-15% service charge is included. If not, you should tip this amount. If it is already included, you are welcome to tip extra to reward good service.
Taxi: 10% of the fare
Tour guide/driver: 10% of the tour price
Hotel staff: small change (such as 100 fils) when appropriate

Tipping in Bangladesh

 

Tipping in Bangladesh is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping in Bangladesh is not compulsory but used to show appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill, especially if no service charge was included
Hotel porter: 20-30 Taka ($0.24-$0.35)
Hotel housekeeper: 20-30 Taka ($0.24-$0.35)
Tour guide: 30-50 Taka ($0.35-$0.60) per day per person
Tour driver: 50 Taka ($0.60)

Tipping in Bhutan

 

Tipping is not compulsory in Bhutan but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Bhutan but it has become common and more customary for tourism-related services (tours and treks).
Restaurants and hotels already include a service charge in the bill and tipping extra is not expected, but you can still do so if service was great.
The local currency is the Bhutanese Ngultrum. 750 Nu. = $10
Restaurant: 10% of the bill, especially if no service charge
Hotel porter: 300-500 Nu. ($4-$7)
Hotel housekeeper: 1,000-1,500 Nu. ($13-$20) for the whole stay
Tour/Trek guide: $10-$20 per day
Tour driver: $10 per day
Trek cook: $5-$8 per day

Tipping in Brunei Darussalam

 

Tipping in Brunei is not very common and not expected.

Tipping is not a common practice and not expected in Brunei.
Usually, a 10% service charge is included for most services, and further tipping is not necessary.

Tipping in Cambodia

 

Tipping is not expected in Cambodia but appreciated.

Tipping is not really part of the culture in Cambodia but always appreciated, because wages are low. US Dollars are widely accepted.
However, don’t tip if service was bad.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill
Hotel porter: $1 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1 per day
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Tour driver: $2 per day
Taxi: no tip expected (for a negotiated fare) or round up the fare

Tipping in China

 

Tipping is not expected in China, with a couple of exceptions.

Tipping is not part of the culture in China and most of the time, it is not expected. In hotels and restaurants, a service charge is already included and no further tipping is expected. However, in high end hotels and restaurants, tipping is becoming more common.
The only exception is for tours, where tipping is rather expected.
High end restaurant: 10% of the bill
High end hotel porter: a few dollars
High end hotel housekeeper: a few dollars per day
Tour guide: $10 per day
Tour driver: $5-$7 per day

Tipping in the Cook Islands

 

Tipping is not expected in the Cook Islands.

Tipping is not customary and not expected at all in the Cook Islands, as it is not part of the culture.

Tipping in Fiji

 

Tipping is not expected in Fiji.

Tipping is not part of the culture and not expected in Fiji. You can give some small change if you see a tip box.

Tipping in French Polynesia

 

Tipping is not customary in French Polynesia.

Tipping is not part of the culture in French Polynesia, and it is not expected. However, small tips will still be accepted and you can give small change or round bills up to reward good service.

Tipping in Georgia

 

Tipping in Georgia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Georgia but appreciated. If you received great service, you can tip:
Restaurant: A 10% service charge is included in the bill. You can round up the bill if you want tot tip.
Hotel bellboy: 3 Laris ($1) (mostly higher-end hotels)
Tour guide: 10-15% of the tour price (for the group)
Tour driver: 5% of the tour price (for the group)

Tipping in Guam

 

Tipping in Guam is most of the time expected.

As a (non-incorporated) U.S. territory, Guam shares a similar tipping culture. However, in Guam, a 10-15% service charge is sometimes included. Be careful to not tip twice!
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill if no service charge
Bartender: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$3 per night
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost
Boat ride: $5-$10 to be shared among the crew members
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Hong Kong

 

Tipping is generally not expected in Hong Kong.

Tipping is not really part of the culture in Hong Kong. It is most of the time not expected, except maybe in the most upscale establishments. A 10£ service charge is frequently added to the bill in hotels and restaurants.

If you do want to tip, you can round up the bill, and give 10-20 Hong Kong Dollars ($1-$2) to the hotel bellboy, but he might not take it.

Tipping in India

 

Tipping in India is not mandatory but expected from tourists.

Tipping is not a requirement in India but it is appreciated and customary/expected in the tourism industry, to show appreciation for good service. You should not tip beggars, not to encourage this activity. A tip in India is called a baksheesh.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill, given to the waiter, if no service charge
Bar: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 20 Rupees ($0.30) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 30-50 Rupees ($0.40-$0.65) per day
Tour guide: 100-300 Rupees ($1.30-$4) per day
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Indonesia

 

Tipping in Indonesia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Indonesia, but it can be used to show appreciation for good service and it is appreciated. At restaurants and hotels, a service charge is often included in the bill. If you tip, you should do so in local currency, the Rupiah.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge | some small change on top of the service charge if great service (give to the waiter directly)
Hotel staff: A 10-11% service charge is included so tipping is not expected. Your can still leave 20,000 rupiahs ($1.40) to the bellboy and the same amount per day to the housekeeper.
Taxi: round up the fare (customary)
Spa, hairdresser: 20,000-50,000 Rupiahs ($1.40-$3.40)
Tour guide: tip not expected, a little extra for great service

Tipping in Iran

 

Tipping in Iran is not expected but appreciated, following a specific custom.

Tipping is not compulsory in Iran but appreciated and quite common in upscale, tourist-oriented establishments.
You need to know that in Iran, it is customary to first refuse the tip, up to three times, before accepting it.
Restaurant: A 10% service charge is included in the bill. You can round up the bill or tip up to 10% on top of the service charge in upscale restaurants.
Hotel bellboy: 50,000 rials ($1.20) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 50,000-100,000 rials ($1.20-$2.40) per day
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Tour driver: 5% of the tour cost
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Iraq

 

Tipping is not common and usually not expected in Iraq.

Tipping is not customary in Iraq and usually not expected. A 10% service charge is sometimes added to the bill at the restaurant. If you absolutely want to tip, you can leave small change to the hotel bellboy or round up the taxi fare.

Tipping in Israel

 

Tipping is very common in Israel.

Tipping is customary and often expected in Israel.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Bar: 10-15% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 5 Shekels ($1.50) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5-10 Shekels ($1.50-$3) per day
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost (or more for a private tour)
Tour driver: 5% of the tour cost (or more for a private tour)
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare

Tipping in Japan

 

Tipping is not expected and not recommended in Japan.

Tipping in Japan is not expected, unnecessary, and sometimes even considered rude/degrading.
The Japanese culture values hard work and there is no need to reward good service further.

Tipping in Jordan

 

Tipping is common and expected in Jordan.

Tipping is part of the culture in Jordan and most of the time expected. A service charge is sometimes included, you should still tip further.
Restaurant: 5-10% to your waiter, on top of the 10% service charge
Bartender: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 Jordanian Dinars ($1.40-$2.80) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 2 Jordanian Dinars ($2.80) per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Tour driver: 5% of the tour cost
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Kazakhstan

 

Tipping is not common practice and not expected in Kazakhstan.

Tipping is not customary in Kazakhstan. A service charge is often included in the bill for more services and there is no need to tip further. If you do want to tip for great service, you can round up the bill or leave small change.

Tipping in Kiribati

 

Tipping is not expected in Kiribati.

Tipping is not part of the culture in Kiribati and it is not expected.

Tipping in North Korea

 

Tipping in North Korea is not mandatory but much appreciated.

Tipping is never mandatory in North Korea but it is much appreciated by tour guides. It is actually quite customary to tip them. However, tipping at restaurants or hotels is not required.
Tour guide and driver: 7 Euros per person per day, shared between the tour and the driver.

Offering a gift to your guide to show appreciation is also very much aligned with the local culture. You can offer male guides cigarettes or liquor, and you can offer perfume to female guides. You can buy these at the airport in Beijing and offer them on the first of second day of the trip.

Tipping in South Korea

 

Tipping is not customary in South Korea.

Tipping is not part of the culture in South Korea and it is not expected. A service charge is included in the final price and there is no need to tip further.
If you absolutely want to tip good service, you can try rounding up the bill, leaving lose change, or leaving max. 5-10% on western-style restaurants.

Tipping in Kuwait

 

Tipping in Kuwait is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory in Kuwait but it is appreciated. The more upscale the establishment, the more expected the tip.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge.
Hotel porter: 0.25-0.50 Kuwaiti Dinars ($0.80-$1.60) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 0.25-0.50 Kuwaiti Dinars ($0.80-$1.60) per day
Taxi: 10% of the fare
Tour guide: 10% of the tour guide
Petrol station attendant: small change – 0.25-0.50 Kuwaiti Dinars ($0.80-$1.60)

Tipping in Kyrgyzstan

 

Tipping in Kyrgyzstan is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is generally not too common in Kyrgyzstan but appreciated. It is more common in larger hotels or upscale establishments catering to tourists. Tipping should be seen as a way to show appreciation for good service. You should tip in local currency, the Kyrgyzstani Som.
Restaurant: a 10% service charge is sometimes included. Round up the bill if good service. Up to 10% if no service charge.
Hotel porter: 80 soms ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 80 soms ($1) per day
Tour/trek guide: 500 soms ($6) per day
Tour/trek porter, cook, driver: 250 soms ($3) per day

Tipping in Laos

 

Tipping in Laos is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not very customary in Laos but it is appreciated and a little more usual for some tourism-related services.
Restaurant: if the 10% service charge is not included, round up the bill or tip 10% if service was great
Hotel bellboy: 10,000-20,000 Kip ($1-$2) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 10,000-20,000 Kip ($1-$2) per day
Taxi: no tip expected (negociated fare) or round up the fare
Tour guide/driver: 30,000-55,000 Kip ($3-$6) per day

Tipping in Lebanon

 

Tipping is common and expected in Lebanon.

Tipping is part of the culture and customary in Lebanon, and most of the time expected. You should tip in local currency, the Lebanese Pound.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill if no service charge
Bartender: 2000 Pounds ($1.30) per drink | 10% of the bill if table service
Hotel bellboy: 1500 Pounds ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1500 Pounds ($1) per night
Hotel concierge: 4000-5000 Pounds ($2.50-$3.30)
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Taxi: 10% of the fare
Anyone providing you a small service: 1000-2000 Pounds ($0.70-$1.40)

Tipping in Macau

 

Tipping in Macau is not expected, but appreciated.

Tipping is not very common in Macau and not expected (a service charge is most of the time included in the bill), but it is a nice way to show appreciation for good service.
The local currency is the Macanese Pataca (MOP$).
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge. Leave some change on top of it for the waiter.
Bartender: 15 MOP$ ($2) is appreciated
Hotel bellboy: 8 MOP$ ($1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 1-3% of the daily room charge
Tour guide: 5-10% of the tour cost
Taxi: round up the bill

Tipping in Malaysia

 

Tipping in Malaysia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is generally not an expectation in Malaysia, except maybe in high-end hotels or restaurants, but it is appreciated. It often consists in leaving some small change in local currency, the Malaysian Ringgit (RM).
Don’t worry too much about tipping in Malaysia, but if you do want to tip, here are some guidelines:
Restaurant: a 10% service charge is usually included in the bill and there is no need to tip further. You can round up the bill if you are satisfied with the service.
Hotel staff: RM2-RM10 ($0.50-$2.40)
Tour guide: up to 10% of the tour cost if great service
Private tour guide: RM25-RM30 ($6-$7) per day
Taxi: tip not expected

Tipping in Maldives

 

Tipping in Maldives is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is officially not required in Maldived but it is always appreciated, and actually pretty common practice, even if a 10% service charge is normally added to the bill. It is fine to use U.S. Dollars in Maldives.
Restaurant: you can round up the bill on top of the service charge, or give a few dollars to the waiter directly.
Hotel porter: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $1.50-$3 per night / $10-$20 per week
Taxi: no tip expected, or round up the bill / a few dollars if help with heavy luggage
Spa: $5-$10
Boat staff: $5-$10 per person per day
Tour guide: $10 per person per day

Tipping in Marshall Islands

 

Tipping is not expected in Marshall Islands.

Tipping is not customary in Marshall Islands and it is not expected.
If you do want to show appreciation for good service, you can still leave a small tip in U.S. Dollars – it is the local currency.
If you had a great time during your tour/diving tour, you can consider tipping up to 10% of the tour cost.

Tipping in Micronesia

 

Tipping is not expected and not encouraged in Micronesia.

Tipping is not recommended in Micronesia because it goes against the local culture. Micronesians are honored to have you as their guest, they are not expecting any tip.

Tipping in Mongolia

 

Tipping in Mongolia is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Mongolia but it is appreciated, and increasingly common in the tourism industry.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill in nice, tourist-oriented restaurants
Hotel bellboy: 2000 tugrik ($0.70) per bag
Hotel hosuekeeper: 1000-2000 tugrik ($0.35-$0.70) per night
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost
Tour driver: 5% of the tour cost
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Myanmar

 

Tipping in Myanmar is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not part of the culture in Myanmar but it is becoming more commonplace as the country is opening to tourism. No service charge is usually not included. If you tip, you should do so in the local currency: the Kyat.
Restaurant: tip not expected, 10% of the bill will be appreciated
Hotel porter: 2000-3000 kyat ($1.30-$2.60)
Hotel housekeeper: 2000-3000 kyat ($1.30-$2.60) per day
Taxi: round up the bill
Tour guide: 8000-10,000 kyat ($6-$7) per person per day for a large group | 10,000-20,000 kyat ($10-$15) for a small group or private tour
Tour driver: 4000-6000 kyat ($3-$5) per person per day

Tipping in Nauru

 

Tipping is not customary on Nauru.

Tipping is not part of the culture on Nauru Island and it is not encouraged.

Tipping in Nepal

 

Tipping in Nepal is not mandatory but expected.

Tipping is not an obligation in Nepal but it is customary and most of the time expected for tourism-related services.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 20 Rupees ($0.20)
Hotel housekeeper: 20 Rupees ($0.20) per day
Tour/trek guide: 1200 Rupees ($10) per day
Trek porter: 600 Rupees ($5) per day
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in New Caledonia

 

Tipping is not expected in New Caledonia.

Tipping is not part of the culture in New Caledonia and is not expected. If you do want to tip, you can round up the bill or give small change.

Tipping in New Zealand

 

Tipping is most of the time not expected in New Zealand.

Tipping is usually not expected and not customary in New Zealand. Service charges are included in the bill and wages are usually fair.
If you do want to tip, it is acceptable to round up the bill or leave small change.

Tipping in Niue

 

Tipping is not expected in Niue but appreciated.

Tipping is never expected on Niue Island, but always appreciated. You can leave small change in the tip box.

Tipping on Norfolk Island

 

Tipping is not expected on Norfolk Island, but appreciated.

Tipping is not mandatory on Norfolk Island but it is appreciated and considered a nice way of showing appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$3 per night

Tipping in the Northern Mariana Islands

 

Tipping is not expected but appreciated in the Northern Mariana Islands.

Tips are not a requirement in the Northern Mariana Island, but they are certainly much appreciated.
However, tipping is quite tricky because different etablishments follow different rules.
Some include a 10% service charge, some don’t.
Your best bet is to tip 10% if no service charge, and a little bit extra if you enjoyed the service – or just ask what kind of tip they are expecting, if any.

Tipping in Oman

 

Tipping in Oman is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not customary and expected in Oman but tips are accepted and appreciated, mostly for tourist services.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 0.50-1 Rial ($1.30-$2.60)
Hotel housekeeper: 0.50-1 Rial ($1.30-$2.60) per day
Tour guide: 1 Rials ($2.60) per day
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Pakistan

 

Tipping in Pakistan is customary and expected.

Tipping is usual and normally expected in Pakistan, especially if the 10% service charge was not included. Better tip in the local currency (Pakistani Rupee) and give to the staff directly.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel porter: 30 Rs ($0.20)
Hotel housekeeper: 30 Rs ($0.20) per day
Hairdresser/spa/massage: 50 Rs ($0.30)
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: tip not expected

Tipping in Palau

 

Tipping in Palau is not required, but appreciated.

Tipping is not compulsory in Palau, as a 10% service charge is almost always added to the bill. Tipping extra is a way to show appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 10% if the bill if no service charge, tip extra if great service
Hotel bellboy: $1-$2 per bag
Hotel housekeeper: $2-$3 per night
Tour guide/Diving guide: $5-$10 per tour/dive

Tipping in the Palestinian Territories

 

Tipping is customary in Palestine.

Tipping is part of the culture in Palestine and generally expected, especially from tourists. Do not tip beggars.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 5 Shekels ($1.50) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5-10 Shekels ($1.50-$3) per day
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost (or more for a private tour)
Tour driver: 5% of the tour cost (or more for a private tour)
Taxi: no tip expected or round up the fare

Tipping in Papua New Guinea

 

Tipping is not expected in Papua New Guinea.

Tipping is not part of the culture in Papua New Guinea and not expected – and can even be discouraged depending on the situation.

Tipping in the Philippines

 

Tipping in the Philippines is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping in the Philippines is not expected but appreciated and getting more common with the development of tourism.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge (“SC”) was included. Tip a few dollars extra if service was great.
Hotel Bellboy: 20-50 pesos ($0.50-$1) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 50 pesos ($1-$2) per day
Bartender: round up the bill
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Qatar

 

Tipping in Qatar is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping in Qatar is not an expectation but it can be used to reward good service. In hotels and restaurants a 10% service charge is frequently added. If it is not, you should tip these 10%. If service was great, you are free to tip extra.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Hotel bellboy: 5 riyals ($1.30) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5-10 riyals ($1-$3) per day
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Tour driver: 5% of the price

Tipping in Russia

 

Tipping is not mandatory in Russia but appreciated.

Tipping in Russia is not required but it is much appreciated and a customary way of showing appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 5-10% opf the bill
Bar: 50 Rubles ($0.60) per drink
Taxi: round up the fare
Private driver/tour guide: $5-$10 (500 Rubles) for a half day tour / $10-$20 (1000 Rubles) for a full day tour
Hotel bellboy: $1-$3 (100-300 Rubles)

Tipping in Samoa

 

Tipping is not expected in Samoa.

Tipping is not part of the culture in Samoa, it is not expected and not practiced.

Tipping in Saudi Arabia

 

Tipping in Saudi Arabia is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping is not customary in Saudi Arabia but it is slowly becoming more common, and it is appreciated. The local currency is the Saudi Riyal (SAR).
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 5 SAR ($1.30) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5-10 SAR ($1.30-$2.60) per night
Tour guide: 40 SAR ($10) per person per day if small group, 25 SAR ($7) if big group.
Tour driver: 20 SAR ($5) per person per day
Taxi: round up the fare

Tipping in Singapore

 

Tipping is usually not expected in Singapore, with a couple of exceptions.

Tipping is not customary in Singapore. Restaurants and hotels include a 10% service charge to the bill and don’t expect customers to tip further.
The most notable exception is for the hotel bellboy, often expecting a tip.
Restaurant: no tip expected, but you can tip up to 10% of the service charge if service was great.
Hotel bellboy: 1-2 Singapore Dollars ($0.75-$1.50) per bag

Tipping in Solomon Islands

 

Tipping is not expected and not recommended in the Solomon Islands.

Tipping is not part of the culture in the Solomon Islands. It is not only only not expected, but also discouraged.

Tipping in Sri Lanka

 

Tipping is usual and expected in Sri Lanka.

Tipping is part of the culture in Sri Lanka and it is expected. You sould tip in the local currency, the Sri Lankan Rupee.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill if no service charge. Round up the bill on top of the service charge.
Bartender: no tip expected or round up the bill
Hotel porter: 50-100 rupees ($0.30-$0.55) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 100 rupees ($0.55) per night
Spa, massage: 10% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare
Tour guide: 10% of the tour cost

Tipping in Syria

 

Tipping in Syria is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in Syria but it is much appreciated and a common way of showing appreciation for good service. It is more expected from tourists/foreigners than it is from locals. You should tip in local currency, the Syrian Pound (SYP).
Restaurants: 10% if no service charge
Hotel bellboy: 100 SYP ($0.20)
Hotel housekeeper: 100 SYP ($0.20)
Taxi: round up the bill

Tipping in Taiwan

 

Tipping is usually not expected in Taiwan.

Tipping is not really part of the culture in Taiwan and tips are rarely expected.
You can leave your hotel housekeeper 100NTD (= $3.50) per day if you want to. As for the hotel bellboy, you can tip $1 per bag.

Tipping in Tajikistan

 

Tipping is usually not expected in Tajikistan.

Tipping is pretty rare and not expected in Tadikistan.
The only exception is that you can tip 10% of the bill at a high-end restaurant in a big city if you absolutely want to, but it is not expected.

Tipping in Thailand

 

Tipping in Thailand is not mandatory but appreciated.

Tipping is not required in Thailand but always appreciated and more and more common for tourism-related services.
Restaurant: if no service charge was included, tip 10% of the bill
Bars: no tip required. 10 bahts per drink if you really want to tip
Taxi: round up the fare
Hotel bellboy: 20 Bahts per bag
Hotel housekeeping: 30-50 Bahts per day (mostly done in upscale hotels)
Tour guide: 10% of the tour price
Masseuse, hairdresser: 10% of the bill, especially if no service charge

Tipping in Timor-Leste

 

Tipping is not expected in East Timor, but appreciated.

Tipping is not a requirement in East Timor but it can be a way to show appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill

Tipping in Tokelau

 

Tipping in Tokelau is not expected.

Tipping is not part of the culture in Tokelau and is not expected.

Tipping in Tonga

 

Tipping is not required in Tonga.

Tipping is not really part of the culture in Tonga but it can be a way to show appreciation for a good service. If you absolutely wish to tip, you can leave a few dollars.

Tipping in Turkey

 

Tipping is generally expected in Turkey.

Tipping in Turkey is not mandatory but most of the time expected. However, don’t tip if you receive bad service.
Restaurant: 5 to 15% depending on how upscale it is
Taxi: round up the fare
Hotel bellboy: 2-4 Turkish Liras (0.25-0.5 USD) per bag
Hotel housekeeper: 5-10 TL
Hotel reception: 20-50 TL in the tip box
Hamam attendant: 15% of the bill (before you leave)

Tipping in Turkmenistan

 

Tipping in Turkmenistan is not expected, but appreciated.

Tipping is not required in Turkmenistan but quite common to show appreciation for good service.
Restaurant: 5-10% of the bill (if no service charge)
Hotel staff: small change

Tipping in Tuvalu

 

Tipping is not expected in Tuvalu.

In Tuvalu, tipping is not part of the culture and not expected.

Tipping in the United Arab Emirates

 

Tipping is not mandatory in the UAE, but customary and appreciated.

In the UAE, tipping is by not a requirement but pretty customary and always appreciated, as a reward for good service. The local currency is the Emirati Dirham (AED). The usual “small tip” is 5 to 10 AED.
Restaurant: 10-15% of the bill
Hotel staff: 5-10 AED ($1.40-$2.70)
Taxi: round up the bill
Spa, massage: 10-15% of the bill
Tour guide: 10-15% of the tour cost

Tipping in Uzbekistan

 

Tipping in Uzbekistan is not expected but appreciated.

Tipping in general is not expected (but always appreciated) in Uzbekistan, especially in larger hotels and tourism services. The local currency is the Uzbekistani Som.
Tour guide: 100-150 soms ($10-$15) per day
Tour driver: 20-50 soms ($2-$5) per day
Restaurant: if the usual 10-15% service charge is not included, tip 15%
Hotel staff: small change, such as 10-20 soms

Tipping in Vanuatu

 

Tipping is not expected in Vanuatu.

Tipping is not expected and even not recommended in Vanuatu, as it goes against the local cuture. If you give a tip to someone, then this person will owe you.

Tipping in Vietnam

 

Tipping in Vietnam is not expected but much appreciated.

Tipping is not originally part of the Vietnamese culture, but it is becoming more common as tourism develops in the country. You can tip if the service was good.
Restaurant: max. 5-10%
Hotel housekeeper: 20-30 dongs ($1) per day
Hotel bellboy: 20-30 dongs ($1) per bag
Taxi: round up the fare
The more upscale your hotel / restaurant, the more tipping will be expected.

Tipping in Wallis & Futuna

 

Tipping is not expected in Wallis & Futuna.

Tourism is still not very developed in Wallis & Futuna, and tipping is not customary and not expected.

Tipping in Yemen

 

Tipping is not expected in Yemen, but appreciated.

Tipping is not really part of the culture in Yemen but you can always tip if you are feeling generous and service was good at a nice restaurant.
Restaurant: 10% of the bill
Taxi: round up the fare

Final Thoughts

There you have it! The ultimate, definitive guide to tipping across the world. We did our best to sort all the countries in the three different categories, to reflect how expected and encouraged tipping is in each country. The information provided in this page should be enough to give you a good idea about the tipping etiquette in each country but don’t hesitate to research more ! The few links above are a good starting point.

Tipping too much is as detrimental as not tipping enough, so it is important to get it right and adapt to your destination’s customs. Ultimately, if you are unsure, the best way to know is to ask what tip is expecting, if any.

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